Irish credit rating is downgraded

26 08 2010

The Irish Republic has had its credit rating downgraded by a leading ratings agency, Standard and Poor’s (S&P).

S&P fears that the growing cost of propping up the country’s troubled banking sector will further weaken the government’s finances.

It now thinks that the Irish government will spend 90bn euros ($101bn; £74bn) helping the banks, 10bn euros higher than previous estimates.

The country’s own debt agency described the analysis as “flawed”.

It claimed that S&P’s outlook was based on an “extreme and unrealistic” scenario of the cost of recapitalising the banks and questioned its calculations.

S&P cut the rating one step to from AA to AA-, its lowest since 1995.

This follows clearance earlier this month for an additional injection of 10bn euros into Anglo Irish Bank.

The agency now forecasts that net government debt – the sum of all borrowing – will rise to 113% of GDP in 2010. That would be a substantial increase on the 64% level recorded in 2009.

Continue Reading: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-11081069

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