Irish credit rating is downgraded

26 08 2010

The Irish Republic has had its credit rating downgraded by a leading ratings agency, Standard and Poor’s (S&P).

S&P fears that the growing cost of propping up the country’s troubled banking sector will further weaken the government’s finances.

It now thinks that the Irish government will spend 90bn euros ($101bn; £74bn) helping the banks, 10bn euros higher than previous estimates.

The country’s own debt agency described the analysis as “flawed”.

It claimed that S&P’s outlook was based on an “extreme and unrealistic” scenario of the cost of recapitalising the banks and questioned its calculations.

S&P cut the rating one step to from AA to AA-, its lowest since 1995.

This follows clearance earlier this month for an additional injection of 10bn euros into Anglo Irish Bank.

The agency now forecasts that net government debt – the sum of all borrowing – will rise to 113% of GDP in 2010. That would be a substantial increase on the 64% level recorded in 2009.

Continue Reading: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-11081069





IMF set to approve Sri Lanka loan payment

25 08 2010

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has indicated it will release the next tranche of a multi-billion dollar loan to Sri Lanka.

Following a two week mission to the country, the body gave an upbeat assessment of Sri Lanka’s economy.

It said government targets for deficit reduction were on track, with taxes increasing and spending being cut.

An IMF mission also arrived in Serbia on Monday to assess its economy with a view to releasing a loan payment.

The body agreed a 3bn euro ($3.8bn; £2.4bn) loan with the country last March.
‘Strong growth’

The IMF approved a $2.6bn (£1.7bn) loan to help Sri Lanka weather the global economic crisis last summer.

The Sri Lankan government also said it would use the money to pay for post-war reconstruction following the end of fighting with the Tamil Tiger rebels.

Continue Reading: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-11064346





China marches towards world’s No. 2 economy

16 08 2010

China's GDP was smaller than Japan's in 2009 but the IMF expects that wont be the case by the end of this year. But China still trails the United States by a wide margin.


China is on track to overtake Japan as the world’s second-largest economy after the United States, figures released Monday show.
Japan’s gross domestic product, or GDP, totaled $1.29 trillion for the three months ending in June, the nation’s Cabinet Office announced. China’s official figure for the same period was $1.34 trillion.

Economist Frederic Neumann at HSBC in Hong Kong said China is forecast to overtake Japan by the end of the year — making China the world’s No. 2 economy. However, official annual figures won’t come until early 2011.

The International Monetary Fund expects China’s output to reach $5.4 trillion by the end of 2010. By comparison, it estimates Japan’s GDP at $5.3 trillion.

Another analyst says the whole matter is academic.

“Basically, China’s underlying growth rate is going to be about 8 percent over the next decade. Japan’s underlying is going to be about 1 percent,” said Jesper Koll, an economist with JPMorgan in Tokyo. “In 10 year’s time, the Chinese economy will be twice the size of the Japanese economy.”

Continue Reading: http://money.cnn.com/2010/08/16/news/international/japan_china/index.htm





German economy sees ‘record’ growth of 2.2%

13 08 2010

The German economy grew by 2.2% in the three months to the end of June, its fastest quarterly growth in more than 20 years, official figures show.

“Such quarter-on-quarter growth has never been recorded before in reunified Germany,” the national statistics office, Destatis, said.

The main reason for the higher-than-expected growth was strong exports, helped by a weaker euro.

The eurozone economy grew by 1% during the quarter.

This compares with growth of 0.2% in the first three months of the year, the area’s official statistics agency, Eurostat, said.

The French economy grew by 0.6% in the second quarter, also up from 0.2%, while the Spanish economy grew by 0.2%, compared with 0.1% in the previous three months.

The pace of growth in the Italian economy remained the same, at 0.4%.

Continue Reading: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-10962017